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December 04, 2006

Proof at the Museum

Urn

Tinselman would like to thank all those at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Like us, they also believe in long horses! And they've been working very hard to prove our point by digging up art and objects of the past that depict the long horse.

Longhorsehist_1 Take, for example, this urn, dating from 1400 - 1370 B.C.. it virtually proves that long horses were used in chariot races. As Tinselman reader Daniel says,

I think this would fit splendidly into [the rapidly multiplying] collection of long horses throughout history. And... this is [yet another] real item. Anybody can go to the met and have a look at it if they don't believe it. Now isn't that cool?

December 4, 2006 | Permalink

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Comments

I never realised long horses had been around for so . . . long. It may even turn out that they were among the first animals to undergo selective breeding by humans (after the dog and sheep). Fascinating.

There must be a goldmine of literary references in ancient texts to corroborate all this. I think I'll start looking.

Posted by: Mark | Dec 4, 2006 6:49:34 PM

Notice also how the ancients strove to correctly represent the aerodynamic nature of the long horse - the little wedge shaped things above its back are clearly air waves.

Posted by: indrabar | Dec 4, 2006 7:12:45 PM

Don't forget this famous representation of the Longhorse in Wilshire.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v22/raincoaster/Animals/Neo11.jpg

Posted by: raincoaster | Dec 6, 2006 5:55:39 PM

Honestly, I am an extreme horse lover, and have never come across this breed in my life. Old urns, though they look like proof, cannot be, since there are no people who can prove that was not an exaggeration the artist made. That's not necessarily how the horse looked, it may just be how the artist portrayed it to be.

Posted by: Kiro | Jan 2, 2007 4:44:57 PM

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